Saturday, September 24, 2016

Carley Garner's "Higher Probability Commodity Trading"

Carley Garner's new book "Higher Probability Commodity Trading" takes readers on an unprecedented journey through the treacherous commodity markets; shedding light on topics rarely discussed in trading literature from a unique perspective, with the intention of increasing the odds of success for market participants.

In its quest to guide traders through the process of commodity market analysis, strategy development, and risk management, Higher Probability Commodity Trading discusses several alternative market concepts and unconventional views such as option selling tactics, hedging futures positions with options, and combining the practice of fundamental, technical, seasonal, and sentiment analysis to gauge market price changes.

Carley, is a frequent contributor of commodity market analysis to CNBC's Mad Money TV show hosted by Jim Cramer. She has also been a futures and options broker, where for over a decade she has had a front row seat to the victories and defeats the commodity markets deal to traders.

Garner has a knack for portraying complex commodity trading concepts, in an easy-to-read and entertaining format. Readers of Higher Probability Commodity Trading are sure to walk away with a better understanding of the futures and options market, but more importantly with the benefit of years of market lessons learned without the expensive lessons.

Get Higher Probability Commodity Trading on Amazon....Get it Here!

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

The Next Big Short



The "Next Big Short" is a collection of looming market risks from The Heisenberg. This 37 page special report will show you the risks in the markets. How to explain The Heisenberg?

Essentially, it's a collective brain trust of skilled traders willing to discuss markets with the freedom of anonymity. You can enjoy Heisenberg's lively market commentary in the TheoDark Report section of their public blog.

Get the "Next Big Short " free special report....Just Click Here

For more backstory, here's Heisenberg in his own words: Heisenberg spent a long time in college. Probably too long. Be that as it may, the experience afforded him extensive cross disciplinary experience. From Aristotle to Kant to Wittgenstein, from Hobbes to Locke to Rousseau, from plain vanilla equities to FX to CDS, Heisenberg is right at home. With degrees in political science and business, as well as extensive post graduate work in political science and public administration, Heisenberg is uniquely positioned to analyze markets from a holistic perspective. He also has a sense of humor, which allows him to fully appreciate how entertaining it is to talk about himself in the third person.

Heisenberg has traded pretty much everything at one time or another and if he hasn’t traded it, he’s studied it enough to drive himself just as crazy as if he had. He doesn’t sleep much because the terminal doesn’t sleep and neither, generally speaking, do currency markets.

Heisenberg once took the law school admission test (LSAT) for fun with no intention of actually going to law school. He then took it again to try and beat his first score. He paid for the second test with profits he made from long calls on a Brazilian water utility ADR that he sold to close from the first iPhone (the 2.5G version that no one remembers) in the middle of a graduate political science class. His score on the verbal section of the graduate management admission test (GMAT) was near perfect. As was his score on the analytical writing portion. Don’t ask about the math section. He got bored after two hours and didn’t care about using the Pythagorean theorem to determine how long Timmy’s shadow was when he was standing next to a 90 degree flag pole.

Professionally, Heisenberg has worked in Manhattan and many other locales and has years of experience generating and monetizing financial web content. He’s continually amused at those who make it seem hard. You provide quality content for users on a consistent basis. Everything else falls into place. Build it, and they will come.

Get the "Next Big Short " free special report....Just Click Here


See you in the markets putting the Next Big Short to work,
Ray C. Parrish
aka the Crude Oil Trader


Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Five Ways to “Crash Proof” Your Portfolio Right Now

By Justin Spittler

The U.S. economy is running out of breath. As you probably know, the U.S. economy has been “recovering” since 2009. The current recovery, now seven years old, is one of the longest in U.S. history. It’s also one of the weakest.

Since 2009, the U.S. economy has grown at just 2.1% per year, making this the slowest recovery since World War II. Last quarter, the economy grew at just 1.1%. We won’t know how the economy did during this quarter until late October.

But we don’t expect good news, and that’s because signs of a stalling economy are everywhere.

They’re in the job market. 
The U.S. economy created 29,000 fewer jobs last month than economists expected. 
They’re in corporate earnings.
Profits for companies in the S&P 500 have been falling since 2014.
They’re even in the price of oil.
Right now, U.S. demand for gasoline is weak, which tells us Americans aren’t driving as much.

Today, we’re going to look at even more evidence that the economy is struggling. If this flood of bad economic data continues, the U.S. could soon enter its first recession in seven years. Normally, this wouldn’t worry us. After all, recessions are a normal part of the business cycle. But we don’t expect the next downturn to be a “run of the mill” recession. According to Casey Research founder Doug Casey, the next financial crisis will be “much more severe, different, and longer lasting than what we saw in 2008 and 2009.” The good news is that there’s still time to protect yourself. We’ll show you how at the end of today’s issue. But first, you need to understand why we’re so worried about the economy.

The U.S. auto market is cooling off..…
The auto market has been one of the economy’s bright spots since the financial crisis. Auto sales have climbed six straight years. Last year, the industry sold a record 17.5 million cars. Many analysts see the booming auto market as proof that the economy is heading in the right direction. Like a house, a car is a big purchase. Most people will only spend thousands of dollars on a car if they think the economy is doing well. After all, you wouldn’t buy a new car if you thought you were going to lose your job next month.

Because of this, car sales can say a lot about consumer confidence.

Auto sales plunged last month..…
     Yahoo! Finance reported last week:
The seasonally adjusted rate of motor vehicle sales decreased to 17 million from 17.88 million in July. Both car and truck sales were down for the month. For August, total vehicle sales were 1,512,556, down from 1,577,407 for a decrease of 4.1%.
After rising 66 straight months, retail car sales have now fallen four out of the last six months. And this trend is likely to continue. According to The Wall Street Journal, the CEO of Ford (F) said he expects his industry to sell fewer cars this year than they did last year. He expects sales to fall even more in 2017.
This isn’t just bad news for automakers like Ford. It’s a problem for the entire economy.

If people buy fewer cars, they’re probably going to take fewer vacations. They’re going to eat out less. They’re going to buy new clothes less often. In other words, the big drop off in car sales could mean U.S. consumers are starting to cut back.

The U.S. manufacturing sector is weakening right now..…
Last week, the Institute of Supply Management (ISM) reported that its Purchasing Managers’ Index fell from 52.6 in July to 49.6 in August. This index measures the strength of the U.S. manufacturing sector. When the index dips below 50, it signals recession.

The U.S. services sector is hurting too..…
The services sector is made up of businesses that sell services instead of goods. It includes industries like banking and healthcare. The ISM Services Index fell from 55.5 in July to 51.4 last month. While this doesn’t indicate recession, last month’s sharp decline was still a major disappointment. Economists expected the index to hit 55.0. Last month’s reading was also the lowest since February 2010. More importantly, the services and manufacturing sectors are now weakening at the same time.

MarketWatch explained why that’s not a good sign last week:
[I]t’s unusual that both indexes would soften so much at the same time. The manufacturing index dropped to 49.4% from 52.6% in August and the ISM services gauge retreated to 51.4% from 55.5%. The combined reading of two indexes was also the weakest in six years.
Since these indexes often track closely with gross domestic product, the surprisingly poor turn has not gone unnoticed.
Right now, several key economic indicators are saying the economy is in trouble..…
We encourage you to take these warnings seriously. If you have any money in the stock market right now, take a good look at your portfolio. Get rid of any expensive stocks. They tend to fall further than cheap stocks during major sell offs. You should also avoid companies that need a growing economy to make money. These include airlines, major retailers, and restaurants; basically any company that depends on a healthy U.S. consumer.

Avoid companies with a lot of debt. If the economy continues to weaken, heavily indebted companies will struggle to pay their lenders. You don’t want to own a company that falls behind on its loans. We encourage you to hold more cash than usual. Setting aside cash will allow you to buy world class businesses for cheap after the next big sell off.

Finally, we recommend you own physical gold. As we often point out, gold is real money. It’s preserved wealth for centuries because it’s a unique asset. It’s durable, easily divisible, and easy to transport. It’s also survived every major financial crisis in history. This makes it the ultimate safe haven asset. These simple yet proven strategies will help “crash proof” your portfolio in case the economy continues to weaken. That’s never been more important.

To see why, watch this short presentation.

It talks about a major warning sign that one of Casey’s analysts recently uncovered. As you’ll see, this same warning appeared before the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s, before the ’97 Asian financial crisis and just before the 2000 tech crash.

More importantly, it explains how you can protect yourself today. Click here to watch.

Chart of the Day

The U.S. manufacturing sector is flashing warning signs. Today’s chart shows the ISM Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) going back to 2000. As we said earlier, this index measures the strength of the U.S. manufacturing sector. Last month, the ISM PMI hit 49.6. Any reading below 50 indicates recession.

You can see this index plunged below 50 during the last two recessions. It also sent out a few “false signals” over the years. It dipped below 50 but a recession never followed. Like any indicator, the ISM PMI isn’t perfect. Still, it’s worth keeping a close eye on. If manufacturing activity continues to weaken, other parts of the economy will too. And the ISM PMI is just one of many economic indicators flashing danger right now.




Get our latest FREE eBook "Understanding Options"....Just Click Here!

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Webinar Replay...Low Risk Setups For Trading Precise Turning Points in Any Market

On September 6th John Carter of Simpler Options treated us to a special online training webinar. We discovered low risk option strategies for catching "bold and beautiful" reversal trades. John also showed us how to hunt for tops and bottoms using low risk setups for trading precise turning points in any market and so much more.

Watch the FREE Replay Here

Most traders have no idea how to capture the massive profit potential from trading major reversals. These days’ markets often turn on a dime and those who wait for ‘conservative’ setups either miss out or suffer steep losses.

Here's what you can expect to learn during this webinar session....

  *  A simple 3-step process to identify major market turning points in any market

  *  How to find low risk, high probability trades in today's volatile market conditions

  *  Why it’s finally possible to catch tops and bottoms in real time on almost any chart

  *  Why these ‘Bold and Beautiful’ reversal trades can be safer than ‘comfortable’ trades

  *  How to avoid getting suckered into the costly traps that most traders fall into

  *  How to adapt your trades automatically for choppy conditions AND big trends

  *  How to know when a support or resistance level is likely to hold or not


       Watch the FREE replay Right Here


       See you in the markets,
       Ray Parrish
       aka the Crude Oil Trader


Get John's latest FREE eBook "Understanding Options"....Just Click Here!




Friday, September 2, 2016

The Subprime Loan Crisis Is Back…Here’s What It Could Mean for the Economy

By Justin Spittler

Subprime loans are going bad again. A “subprime” loan is a loan made to someone with bad credit. If the term sounds familiar, it’s because lenders issued millions of subprime loans during the early to mid-2000s. Banks made these risky loans thinking housing prices would “never fall.” When they did, subprime borrowers stopped paying their mortgages. The U.S. housing market collapsed, triggering the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression.

These days, lenders aren’t making as many reckless mortgages. But subprime lending is alive and well in the auto market. Since the financial crisis, subprime auto lending has exploded. According to Experian, subprime auto loans now make up more than 20% of all U.S. auto loans. Millions of Americans with bad credit now own cars they should have never bought in the first place. Risky subprime loans have also made the auto loan market incredibly fragile.

Right now, people are falling behind on their car loans at an alarming rate. As you'll see, this isn't just a big problem for lenders and car companies. It could also spell trouble for the entire U.S. economy.

Subprime auto loan delinquencies are skyrocketing…..
CNBC reported on Friday:
Delinquencies of at least 60 days for subprime auto loans are up 13 percent month over month for July, according to Fitch Ratings, and 17 percent higher from the same period a year ago.
Folks with good credit are falling behind on their car loans too. CNBC continues:
Even prime delinquencies are on the rise — Fitch Ratings' survey said that last month's prime auto loans were 21 percent more delinquent than in July 2015.
Prime loans are loans made to people with good credit.

The auto industry is preparing for more delinquencies…..
Last month, Ford (F) and General Motors (GM) warned that rising delinquencies could hurt their businesses in the second half of this year.
According to USA Today, both giant carmakers have set aside millions of dollars to cover potential losses:
In a quarterly filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Ford reported in the first half of this year it allowed $449 million for credit losses, a 34% increase from the first half of 2015.
General Motors reported in a similar filing that it set aside $864 million for credit losses in that same period of 2016, up 14% from a year earlier.
Investors who own subprime loans are taking heavy losses.....

USA Today reported on Thursday:
[T]hese loans are packaged into bundles which are sold to investors, much like mortgages were packaged into bundles a decade ago before rising interest rates caused many of them to default, eventually triggering the deepest economic crisis since the Great Depression. The annualized net loss rate — the percentage of those subprime loan bundles regarded as likely to default — rose 7.39% in July, up 28% from July 2015.
You may recall that Wall Street did the same thing with mortgages during the housing boom. They made securities from a bunch of bad mortgages. They marked them as safe and then sold them to investors. When the underlying mortgages went bad, folks who owned these securities suffered huge losses. These dangerous products allowed the housing crisis to turn into a full-blown global financial crisis.

By itself, a collapse of the auto loan market probably won’t trigger a repeat of the 2008 financial crisis..…

That’s because the auto loan market is much smaller than the mortgage market. The value of outstanding auto loans is “only” about $1 trillion. While that’s an all-time high, the auto loan market comes nowhere close to the $10 trillion residential mortgage market. Still, we’re keeping a close eye on the auto loan market.

If Americans are struggling to pay their car loans, they’re going to have trouble paying their mortgages, student loans, and credit cards too. This would obviously create problems for lenders and credit card companies. It will also hurt companies that depend on credit to make money.

E.B. Tucker, editor of The Casey Report, is shorting one of America’s most vulnerable retailers..…
In June, E.B. shorted (bet against) one of America’s biggest jewelry companies. According to E.B., credit customers make up 62% of its customers. These customers are 350% more valuable to the company than cash customers.

In other words, this company depends heavily on credit. This is a huge problem…and will only get worse as more folks continue to fall behind on their credit card bills—or stop paying them altogether. This is already happening at the company E.B shorted. He explained in the June issue of The Casey Report:
And the company is facing another problem…consumers failing to pay back their loans. From 2014 to fiscal 2016, its annual bad debt expenses rose from $138 million to $190 million. That’s a 30% increase. Over the same period, credit sales grew by only 20%. That means bad debt expenses rose 50% faster than credit sales.
He warned that “tough times are coming for the jewelry business.”

E.B.’s call was spot on..…
Last Thursday, the company reported bad second quarter results. For the second straight quarter, the company’s earnings fell short of analysts’ estimates. The company’s stock plummeted 13% on the news. It’s now down 10% since E.B. recommended shorting it in June. But E.B. says the stock is headed even lower:
We think there’s more pain to come as credit financing dries up…sales continue to drop…and more loans go unpaid.
You can learn more about this short by signing up for The Casey Report. If you act today, you can begin for just $49 a year. Watch this short video to learn how.

This is easily one of the best deals you'll come across in our industry..…
That’s because Casey readers are crushing the market. E.B.’s portfolio is up 19% this year. He’s beat the S&P 500 3-to-1. What’s more, Casey Report readers are set up to make money no matter what happens to the economy—and that’s never been more important. To learn why, watch this short presentation.

Chart of the Day

Not all dividend-paying stocks are safe to own..…

Today’s chart compares the annual dividend yield of the U.S. 10-year Treasury with the annual dividend yield of the S&P 500. Right now, 10 years are paying about 1.5%. Companies in the S&P 500 are yielding 2.0%.

You can see the S&P 500 almost never yields more than 10 years. It’s only happened two other times since 1958. The first time was during the 2008 financial crisis. The other time was just after the recession.
If you’ve been reading the Dispatch, you know the Federal Reserve is partly responsible for this. For the past eight years, the Fed has held its key interest rate near zero. This caused bond yields to crash. With Treasuries yielding next to nothing, many investors have bought stocks for income. But there’s a problem.

Companies in the S&P 500 are paying out $0.38 for every $1.00 they make in earnings. That’s close to an all time high. About 44 companies in the S&P 500 are paying out more in dividends than they earned over the past year. Meanwhile, corporate earnings have been in decline since 2014. Clearly, companies can’t continue to pay out near-record dividends for much longer.

As we explained yesterday, some companies may cut their dividends. This could cause certain dividend-paying stocks to crash. Some investors could see years’ worth of income disappear in a day. If you own a stock for its dividend, make sure the company can keep paying you even if the economy runs into trouble. We like companies with healthy payout ratios, little or no debt, and proven dividend track records.



Get our latest FREE eBook "Understanding Options"....Just Click Here!


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